Video and Plenary Lecture: The Global Citizens Youth Summit

This summer I had the distinct pleasure of being a faculty member during the 2015 Global Citizens Youth Summit, organized by Yumi Kuwana and held at Harvard University. The summit gathered 24 youth from around the world, with a curriculum focused on roundtable discussions about global ethics, global leadership, and social change.

A short video about the summit is here, and more information about the summit is here.

Curricular materials I used in class included: the UN Declaration of Human Rights, Jane Elliott’s “A Class Divided” experiment on racial discrimination, and the Agricultural Justice Project’s documentary Hungry for Justice: Spotlight on the South.

The slides and text for my plenary lecture on leadership, “Extending the Table,” are here. In it I offer three portraits and brief case studies of leadership, derived from the film Pray the Devil Back to Hell, Appalshop’s Appalachian Media Institute, and my travels in Bosnia-Herzegovina. It felt like one of the most important talks I’ve given in my career, an articulation of my intellectual and ethical commitments to a group of youth I profoundly admire, and from whom I learned so much in an extraordinary week together.

About Tom Simpson

Tom Simpson teaches religion, ethics, philosophy, and human rights at Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, NH. He is the author of *American Universities and the Birth of Modern Mormonism, 1867-1940* (University of North Carolina Press, 2016) and nonfiction essays about Bosnia for the Canadian literary magazine *Numero Cinq*. Born in 1975 in Olean, NY, he earned the Ph.D. in religious studies from the University of Virginia, where he specialized in American religious history. He writes, teaches, and lectures about religion in America, popular culture, Mormonism, and Bosnia. He lives in Exeter with his partner, Alexis Simpson, and their two children.
This entry was posted in Bosnia, Ethics, Food, Gender, Human Rights, Race, Social Justice and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s